In Your Face Morning Mocha

You can have a long-term pantry full of dry products, but you also need to go through them on a steady rate, so you don’t waste them. This is a key rule of prepping! But while it can be easy to buy vast quantities, knowing how to use them isn’t so easy.

This easy to whip up dry mix comes from our book Trail Cooking: Trail Food Made Gourmet, on page 24. It’s a tasty way to wake up in the morning, wether or not you actually need to use your emergency supplies.

In Your Face Morning Mochas

Ingredients:

Directions:

Mix all ingredients together in a large bowl. Bag the powder into ½ cup portions, either in snack size zip top bags or in small mason jars.

2 Tbsp of espresso powder will provide a sweet mocha flavor. 4 Tbsp will give you the “bite” of a double shot.

To prepare:

Add 1 cup boiling water slowly to the mix, stirring well. Sip away and wake up!

Makes 5 to 6 servings.

Three Trail Ready Recipes

As I walked our property this morning, I listened to birds in the trees, and realized the birds are early this year. Not only has it been un-wintery, it has been warm. I keep watching the trees and bushes pushing on buds. If it continues this path, spring will be early.

Evergreen Huckleberry buds showing.

Which leads me to dreams of hiking and backpacking coming soon. Maybe sooner than later. In the years before we had more boys, I often backpacked in winter. But I won’t lie….hiking in Spring is a lot nicer – and warmer.

These three recipes are favorites of ours, and are in Freezer Bag Cooking: Adventure Ready Recipes. All about the comfort food, these are all carb-fests: potatoes, pasta, and rice…and they also work well for emergency food prepping – and can be stored in mason jars for long-term food storage.

Alfredo Mashers

In a quart freezer bag:

  • ¾ cup instant mashed potatoes (plain)
  • 2 Tbsp dry milk
  • 2 Tbsp shelf stable Parmesan cheese (green can)
  • 1 Tbsp dry Alfredo sauce mix
  • ¼ tsp granulated garlic
  • ¼ tsp ground black pepper
  • Also take:
  • 1 Tbsp or 1 packet olive oil

FBC Method:

Add 1 cup near boiling water and the oil, and stir well. Seal and let sit until cool enough to eat. Stir before eating.

One Pot Method:

Bring 1 cup water and oil to a boil in a small pot. Take off heat. Add in dry mashed potatoes, stir well. Let cool a bit before eating.

To make heartier meal, with a dose of protein, add a 3 to 5 ounce can (make sure it has a pop top), or 7 ounce pouch, of chicken breast (include any broth) with the water.

Serves 1.

Dry weight is 4 3/8 ounces. If adding in a 7 ounce pouch chicken, 11 3/8 ounces.

Beef Stroganoff

In a quart freezer bag:

In a leak-proof bottle take:

  • 2 tsp ketchup
  • 1 tsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tsp low sodium beef bouillon powder
  • Couple grinds black pepper

Also pack:

  • 1-ounce tub or foil packet cream cheese

FBC Method:

Add 1½ cups nearly boiling water to the past bag, seal tightly and put in a cozy for 15 minutes. Drain off most of the remaining water carefully, leaving about a Tablespoon behind (this actually is pretty good tasting broth). Add in the cream cheese and sauce blend. Stir till blended.

One Pot Method:

Bring 1½ cups water to a boil, add in pasta bag contents. Cover tightly, take off stove, and let sit for 10 minutes. Drain and proceed as above.

Serves 1.

Notes:

A 3-ounce package of ramen noodles can be substituted, or chuka soba noodles. Gluten-free ramen noodles can also be used. Discard flavor packet and break up the noodles a bit.

Hungry teens/men may want to use as much as 1/4 cup hamburger.

You can take ketchup packets instead, and dry Worcestershire sauce powder can be found online. Shelf stable cream cheese is also sourced online. If you carry regular cream cheese, you can find small tubs or packets by the bagels in grocery store bakeries. It is good for 2 or so days carrying in a pack, unless it is super hot out. Otherwise, you can also use Laughing Cow cheese wedges, which are shelf stable (even though they are sold chilled often).

Meaty Marinara Pilaf

In a quart freezer bag:

FBC Method:

Add 1¼ cups near boiling water and stir well. Sal tightly and put in a cozy for 15 minutes. Fluff up.

One Pot Method:

Bring 1¼ cups water to a boil in a small pot. Add in ingredients, stir well and cover tightly. Take off stove and let rest for 10 minutes. In cooler weather, or at altitude, stash pot in a pot cozy.

Serves 1.

Note:

To boost calorie count, add in 1 Tablespoon or 1 packet olive oil. Add more cheese on top if desired. For larger appetites, use up to ¼ cup dried meat (Add in a Tablespoon more water for each Tablespoon dried meat).

~Sarah

Pantry Staples: Rustic Pasta

This very simple rustic pasta recipe has great shelf-life for long-term food storage, and stores up in a mason jar in the pantry, for whenever you need a quick meal. It also works well for camping and backpacking, when you have a family or small group to serve. If taking it camping, just package the pasta into a sandwich bag to carry it.

Rustic Pasta

Put in a quart mason jar:

  • 16 ounces small pasta* or angel hair, broken in half
  • ½ cup dried onion

In a snack size bag:

  • ½ cup Parmesan cheese
  • ¼ cup hulled hemp seeds
  • 2 Tbsp dried basil
  • 2 tsp granulated garlic

Also take:

  • 4 packets or ¼ cup olive oil
  • 4.3 ounce bag shelf stable crumbled bacon

Directions:

Tuck the snack bag and olive oil packets in with the pasta, in the mason jar. Seal tightly. Use within a year and keep in a cool/dry location. For the shelf stable bacon be sure to note when it expires, and use within the time frame. Look in large grocery stores for natural versions without preservatives.

To Cook:

Bring a pot of water to boil, add in pasta, cook for time on package, lowering flame so it doesn’t boil over, stirring often.

Drain carefully, leaving about 2 Tablespoons water behind. Add in oil, seasoning bag, and bacon. Stir till coated.

For outdoor cooking:

Bring a pot of water to boil (for best results use a 2 to 3 liter size pot). Add in pasta, cook for time on package, lowering flame so it doesn’t boil over, stirring often.

Drain carefully, leaving about 2 Tablespoons water behind. Add in oil, seasoning bag, and bacon. Stir till coated.

Serves 4.

To make instant:

Use precooked and dehydrated pasta. Bring 4 cups water to a boil, add in pasta and onion. Stir, cover, and let sit for 10 minutes off the stove. Follow as above.

In cool temperatures or if at altitude, insulate your pot with a pot cozy, or anything to insulate the pot.

~Sarah

Outdoor Cooking Methods

A long time ago (OK, it was like the summer of 2002) I was getting heavily into backpacking. I was on the trail a lot then, often 3 days a week and out on trips 3 to 4 weekends a month. Like many hikers in that time period I knew of two choices: buying the (then) nasty commercial meals (which never tasted great and were always gloopy) or there were a few backpacking cookbooks that were mostly for those who were still living in the glory days of the 1970’s with striped knee socks on. I wasn’t. As I went out more I couldn’t afford to buy that many meals – and I also couldn’t stand eating them anymore. I started pulling together meals I could make with just hot water, and in 2004 FBC was born (Freezer Bag Cooking). Before that, there were some recipes in books (it was often called zip loc bag recipes or turkey bag recipes back then) and the early days of the internet, but in my recipe developing overdrive, I created 1000’s of recipes in the years after. Kirk and I wrote five cookbooks for the trail along with our hosting of TrailCooking website online. As the years went by we expanded and developed other recipes for the outdoors, including one pan (where there was actual cooking involved) and even baking methods. I have published a smattering of backpacking recipes on Never Free, and realize it might be confusing when I list all the cooking methods, so below is an explanation of what each method is.

And most of all, these recipes and methods work for long-term food storage, prepping and travel meals as well.

FBC (Freezer Bag Cooking)

When we started developing recipes for outdoor cooking and backpacking, nearly all our recipes the first couple years were for the method called Freezer Bag Cooking™, or also known as FBC.

When asked “What is FBC?” the answer is it is making your own meals, just the way you want. Consider them to be similar to commercial freeze-dried meals, but without the cost, and you can customize them exactly to how you want. Have dietary restrictions? No issues. Want a smaller or bigger appetite? Easily changed.

How to do FBC:

Most people who do the FBC method will package their meals at home before the trip. You will want to note on each bag what the meal is and how much water is required. Some will tuck a tiny note inside, others use a permanent marker on the outside.

When getting ready to “cook” your meal, bring your water to a near boil. Pour the water into your cup to measure, then add it to your freezer bag. This way you avoid the chance of burns, adding too much water, or touching your freezer bag with a burning hot piece of metal – and having the small potential of melting the bag. You DO NOT need boiling water to rehydrate meals! Boiling is at 212°, 180° water will work just fine. If you need to boil your water to remove any chance of water born pathogens let it cool for a couple of minutes and then proceed.

Stir with a long-handled metal, wooden (bamboo) or heat safe plastic spoon. After you have mixed it well, zip up the bag tightly and wrap in a fleece hat, jacket or cozy made for the purpose. Then let sit for 5 to 15 minutes (the recipe and altitude will determine how long), make yourself a drink and wait for your meal. Once ready, stir well and eat. We usually put our freezer bag into our cozies before we add the water (since we use a dedicated cozy), this works well as we don’t have to hold the bag upright while the water is added.

What is a cozy?

Any dedicated insulating layer to wrap around your bag(s). We developed a fabric cozy and sold them for many years, before setting that business free and letting others do it.

A Note On Squeezing/Kneading Bags:
If you squeeze or knead your bags to mix up the food, be very careful – be sure you have pushed out all the air before you do this. The steam from the hot liquid can cause a build up and your kneading could cause the bag to pop open. For items like mashed potatoes and stuffing kneading if done carefully works well.

The “How Do I Eat Out Of The Bag?” question:
This can take a little practice, but after your food is ready, roll the top 1/3 of the bag down (imagine you are cuffing socks). This will make your bag into its own bowl. If eating soup or chowder, be careful. With a sharp camp knife cut off the top half to make a “bowl”.

The “How Do I Feed 2 People?” Question:

Many of the recipes are listed as feeding two people, which might make one wonder, how do you feed 2 our of 1 bag? My answer to this has to been to bring two bags with me – an extra bag (usually recycled from having held dry food before). After the meal is ready, I do the final stirring, then divide the meal between the two bags.

Insulated Mug Method

The insulated mug method is very similar to using the FBC method, but using an insulated mug instead of freezer bags. The mug acts as a cozy for you, keeping your food hot for you. Follow the FBC method if a recipe does not mention using a mug.

The method works best for solo meals for one in the range of ½ cup to 1½ cups water added.

It will depend of course on what size mug you carry while backpacking/traveling. Do you take a 12 ounce mug? Or a 18 ounce one? A 12 ounce mug works best with no more than 1 cup water added to dry ingredients. A 18 ounce mug should be 1½ cups or less water added. You will need room for your food to expand!

If super hungry, there is always the Super Grande coffee mugs found at truck stops across the country. You could fix a meal for a logger in one of those puppies!

You can take any sturdy (yet light) mug that you prefer but you will want a good tight-fitting lid. Be it plastic or metal, either is up to you. If you use metal be warned the interior will be cold in winter. Preheating with hot water will be needed to not chill your food. As well, you will want to ensure your mug is double walled, so as to retain heat.

The method:

Add your dry ingredients to the mug, along with oil and meats if called for and then add the amount of boiling water called for. Stir well, cover the mug tightly and let sit for 5 to 15 minutes, depending on the time called in the recipe. Stir well and eat.

One Pot Method

The most traditional method of trail cooking is the One Pot Method, using a lightweight pot to cook your meal in. By incorporating the methods of FBC (Freezer Bag Cooking) into it you can avoid lengthy cook times (and pot scrubbings), as well you can save fuel. This method is attractive to long distance hikers, and to those avoiding the use of plastics. It also works well for cooking larger meals, and when making meals when there is power outages that require boiling of water.

To save time, at home bag each meal up. You can use snack and sandwich bags for this. Be sure to mark with a permanent marker or tuck a small note inside that notes what the meal is and how much water is called for. You can also store dry meal mixes in mason jars and store in a cool, dry place.

Add the water called for, any oil and meat to your pot. In some cases the recipe will call for the dried vegetables or the dried ingredients to be added as well. Follow the recipe directions to be sure. Bring the water to a boil, turn off your stove and add in the dry items. Stir well and cover tightly. At altitude or in cooler temperatures you will want to consider using a pot cozy to insulate your pot (it retains quite a bit of heat in). You can make your own easily out of metallic bubble wrap.

The cleaning of your pot is easier this way than if you do regular cooking, where you simmer for a lengthy time, such as 10 to 20 minutes. When done, wipe out with a paper towel and then rinse with a mild mixture of outdoor safe soap/water. If you use a non-stick pot you often won’t need a scrubby pad unless you have added a lot of cheese – and wiping with a paper towel really removes cheese if you do it before it gets cold.

No Cook Method

No cook trail meals can make great lunches, an easy meal in bad weather when backpacking, and also they have been extremely popular with long distance hikers looking to save weight on fuel. They also are great for road trips, car camping, even in hotel rooms when traveling. None of the recipes require a stove or heat source.

Pack your meals at home in a snack, sandwich or pint/quart freezer bag (whatever you prefer). Note the amount of water on the bag in permanent marker and what the meal is or tuck a small note inside.

Depending on the recipe rehydration will be nearly instant to up to 30 minutes. Add in cool water, seal the bag and knead or shake gently. Set aside till ready.

Simple eating on a cold day, you can make some meals in advance and carry them till lunch time. Or for nights when it is raining or snowing, and you don’t want to sit outside for 20 minutes while it dumps on you (however NEVER eat in a tent if in bear territory).

~Sarah

Taters Made Portable: 10 Recipes For Hiking & Prepping

Potatoes have gotten the short stick in the past few years in the healthy eating discussions, but there is something enduring about them for backpacking recipes and food prepping. The massive hit of potassium helps prevent painful nighttime cramps if you have exerted yourself during hot days. Which, when it happens in a tight sleeping bag sucks beyond belief. But outside of that, there is something so comfort food about potatoes on the trail. These recipes are great for hiking, camping, backpacking and as always, for prepping meals. You can store all the recipes in glass mason jars, sealed tightly for use in emergencies. Just add hot water, and you will have a meal quickly. Be sure to mark either your bag or jar with how much water is required.

Over the years we have written 5 cookbooks for the great outdoors. We showcase 3 ways of preparing meals outside: FBC (Freezer Bag Cooking), using an insulated mug, or doing it one pot style (I will be writing a post soon about each of the methods). If using these recipes for emergency or prepper meals, you can always just add the hot water to the mason jar – or add the dry ingredients into your pot. For storage, if using them for emergency food, storing in mason jars will keep the ingredients fresh for a long time. Those with dry dairy should be used up within a year of dry mixing.

In no order, here are 10 recipes we love that feature potatoes that come from our many years of developing backpacking and outdoor cooking recipes:

Alfredo Mashers

In a quart freezer bag:

¾ cup instant mashed potatoes (plain)
2 Tbsp dry milk
2 Tbsp shelf stable Parmesan cheese (green can)
1 Tbsp dry Alfredo sauce mix
¼ tsp granulated garlic
¼ tsp ground black pepper

Also take:
1 Tbsp or 1 packet olive oil

FBC Method:

Add 1 cup near boiling water and the oil, and stir well. Seal and let sit until cool enough to eat. Stir before eating.

One Pot Method:

Bring 1 cup water and oil to a boil in a small pot. Take off heat. Add in dry mashed potatoes, stir well. Let cool a bit before eating.

To make heartier with a dose of protein, add a 3 to 5 ounce can (make sure it has a pop top), or 7 ounce pouch, of chicken breast (include any broth) with the water.

Serves 1.

Dry weight is 4 3/8 ounces. If adding in a 7 ounce pouch chicken, 11 3/8 ounces.

Recipe is from Freezer Bag Cooking: Adventure Ready Recipes.

Bacon & Corn Chowder

In a quart or gallon freezer bag (see notes):

1 cup plain instant mashed potatoes
1 cup freeze-dried corn
¼ cup dry milk
¼ cup Parmesan cheese (green jar type)
1 Tbsp dried parsley
1 tsp granulated garlic
1 tsp Old Bay Garlic & Herb blend or similar
1 tsp dried dill weed

Also take:

4 packets broth concentrate
1 packet olive oil
3 ounce bag shelf-stable bacon (see notes)

FBC Method:

Bring 4 cups water to boil. Set aside while adding the oil and broth concentrate to the freezer bag. Put bag in a cozy, slowly add water while stirring. Seal tightly and let sit for 5 minutes.

One Pot Method:

Bring 4 cups water, oil and broth concentrate to a boil. Add in dry ingredients, stir well and cover tightly. Take off stove and let sit for 5 minutes. In cooler temperatures or at higher altitude, use a pot cozy to retain heat.

Serves 2.

Notes:

Why the bag sizes? Quart bags only hold about 2 cups water reasonably. If you want to do FBC, use a gallon bag – or divide the dry between two bags, so each person has their own bag. Either way.

Plan a breakfast to use the other half of the bacon the next day, or if you like it extra bacon-y, use the whole bag!

Grab a couple of small round rolls of sourdough or french bread at your grocery store bakery before leaving town. They are easy to cut off the top, rip out the bread and use them for “bowls”. Often stores sell them two per bag. If that fails, a few crusty rolls packed on top of your pack are nice.

Cheesy Bacon Mashers
Ingredients:
1½ cup instant mashed potatoes
1⁄3 cup dry milk
3 Tbsp cheese sauce powder
¼ tsp ground black pepper
3 Tbsp shelf stable bacon or bacon bits

Instructions:

At home pack everything in a quart freezer or sandwich bag. If using shelf stable bacon, pack it separately.

FBC method:

Add the bacon and 2 1/4 cups near boiling water. Stir well and let sit till cool enough to eat.

Mug method:

Add the bacon and 2 1/4 cups boiling water. Stir well and let sit till cool enough to eat.

Serves 2.

Notes:
Find cheese sauce powder online, or in some grocery stores – often sold in the popcorn aisle. Cheese sauce powder from boxed mac n’ cheese can be used instead, or dice up 1-ounce of cheddar cheese, add with hot water.

Mashed Potato Burritos

Ingredients:
¾ cup instant mashed potatoes
1 Tbsp dry milk
1 Tbsp butter powder
1 Tbsp sour cream powder
2 flour tortillas
2 packets salsa
1 ounce cheddar or co-jack cheese

At home:

Bag the dry ingredients in a pint freezer bag, mark “Add 1 cup water”. Put the tortillas in a tightly sealed plastic bag. Tuck in the salsa and cheese with everything.

Freezer bag method:

Add the hot water to the quart freezer bag. Stir well, seal and let sit while you prep the cheese.

Insulated mug method:

Add the dry ingredients to your mug along with the boiling water. Stir well and let sit while you prep the cheese.

For both methods:

Slice the cheese up. Lay down a section of clean paper towel. Place your tortillas down. Spread the mashed potatoes between the two tortillas. Top with cheese, then salsa. Roll up and eat.

Serves 1.

Creamy Potato Soup (Bulk Soup Mix)
Ingredients:
2 cups instant mashed potatoes
1¾ cup dry milk
½ cup shelf stable parmesan cheese (green can)
2 Tbsp lower sodium bouillon powder (veggie, beef or chicken)
2 Tbsp diced dried onion
1 Tbsp dried parsley
1 tsp dried garlic
½ tsp ground pepper
1 tsp dried thyme

Instructions:
At home mix the ingredients in a large bowl. Divide the soup mix up by ½ cup dry portions. Depending on if you will be using freezer bags, or a mug to have your soup in, pack in quart freezer bags or sandwich bags.

FBC method:

Add 1 cup near boiling water to the bag and stir till smooth. Let cool a bit.

Mug method:

Add 1 cup boiling water to the dry mix in your mug and stir till smooth. Let cool a bit.

One pot method:

Bring 1 cup water to a boil, take off the heat and stir in the dry mix until smooth. Let cool a bit.

Makes 8 servings.

Notes:
Creamy Potato Soup mix is a great way to get a potassium rich meal into you when you are so tired you can’t face eating. It is easy to mix up, and quite affordable. Carry a packet or two with you in your food bag, as a backup for cold evenings as well. It rehydrates easily in a freezer bag or in your mug.
You can add a couple Tablespoons shelf stable bacon, or a 3 ounce packet of smoked salmon to make a hearty dinner.
For extra richness add in a packet of olive oil with the water. Season to taste with salt and pepper as desired.

Potatoes and bacon for a breakfast backpacking recipe? Potassium from the taters will have you ready for hot days.

Breakfast Taters

Ingredients:
½ cup instant mashed potatoes
2 Tbsp cheese sauce powder
1 Tbsp dry milk
3 Tbsp shelf stable bacon or bacon bits

Instructions:
At home pack everything in a pint freezer or sandwich bag. If taking shelf stable bacon, pack separately in a small plastic bag.

FBC method:
Add ½ cup near boiling water and mix well. Add a bit more water if needed. Let cool.

Mug method:
Add ½ cup boiling water and mix well. Add a bit more water if needed. Let cool.

Serves 1.

Notes:
When hiking in very hot weather, a good helping of potatoes will help you absorb water better and can ward off painful leg cramps.
Cheese sauce powder can be found online or in some grocery stores, in the popcorn section. You can use cheese sauce powder from boxed mac and cheese, or use 1-ounce cheddar cheese, diced up, and added in with the water as well.

Blustery Day Double Potato Chowder
Ingredients:
1 cup dried instant hash browns
¼ cup diced dried onions
4 tsp low sodium vegetable or beef bouillon powder
1 tsp dried parsley
¼ tsp diced dried garlic
¼ tsp dried thyme
¼ tsp ground black pepper
½ cup instant mashed potatoes
¼ cup shelf stable parmesan cheese
½ cup fried onions
1 Tbsp olive oil or 1 packet

At home:

In a sandwich bag, pack the hash browns through black pepper. In a second bag, pack the mashed potatoes through the fried onions. Tuck in the oil.

In camp:

Add the vegetable/seasoning bag and 4 cups water to your pot. Cover and set aside for 15 minutes for the vegetables to rehydrate. Add the oil, stir well and bring to a boil. Lower the flame to low, cover and simmer on a low boil for five minutes. Turn off the stove and the contents of the cheese/potato bag to the pot. Stir well, taste for seasoning and more pepper and salt as desired.

Serves 2.

Shepherd’s Pie

Ingredients:

2 lbs lean ground beef, bison or venison
8-ounces (half a bag) of frozen mixed veggies (use small cut)
2/3 cup ketchup
3 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce
Salt or seasoned salt, pepper, and dried onion flakes to taste

You will also need:

2 pouches of “just add water” instant potatoes.

Directions for the at home prep:

Brown ground meat, then drain any remaining fat. Mix in veggies, ketchup, Worcestershire sauce, and seasonings, then put into a casserole dish. Bake covered on 350° for about 25 minutes.

Spoon the “pie filling” onto dehydrator trays lined with parchment paper. It usually takes about 12 to 16 hrs to fully dehydrate (dry at your meat setting, usually 145* or higher). You’ll have to check it about halfway through, and maybe mix things around a little so they dry evenly.

Once the meat mixture is dried and cooled, separate into 1 cup servings and pack in quart freezer bags. This rehydrates at about a 1:1 ratio.

In a second quart freezer bag, add ½ cup of instant potatoes. (1 bag potatoes per bag of filling)

In camp:

Add 1 cup of near boiling water to the meat mixture. Seal tightly and let “cook” in a freezer bag cozy for about 15 minutes, or until meat is tender. Pour potato flakes over the meat mixture, then add an additional 1/2 cup of water (less if you have water left over that wasn’t absorbed by the meat). Stir and enjoy! (Or you can prepare the potatoes in the second bag and then top the sauce with them.)

Note: Don’t package the meat mixture and potatoes together! The potatoes will magically absorb most of the water and you’ll end up with soupy potatoes and crunchy meat…

Italian-ish Double Cheese Taters

Ingredients:
2⁄3 cup instant mashed potatoes
2 Tbsp sun dried tomatoes, sliced thin (air dried, NOT oil packed)
1 Tbsp dry milk
1 Tbsp butter powder
1 Tbsp shelf stable parmesan cheese (green can)
¼ tsp granulated garlic
¼ tsp Italian seasoning
5 ounce can chicken breast (with pop-top lid)
1 packet string cheese

Instructions:
At home pack the dry ingredients into a quart freezer bag for FBC, or a sandwich bag for the insulated mug or one pot methods. Write “1 cup water” on the bag. Tuck the chicken with the bag and pack the cheese stick before leaving.

FBC Method:

Bring 1 cup water to a near boil. Add the chicken with broth to the mashed potatoes, then the water. Stir till well mixed, making sure there is no powder in the corners. Seal tightly and let sit in a cozy for 5 minutes.

Dice up the cheese and add in.

Insulated Mug Method:

Bring 1 cup water to a boil. Dump the potato mix into your mug, add the chicken with broth to the mashed potatoes, then the water. Stir till well mixed, making sure there is no powder in the corners. Cover tightly for 5 minutes.

Dice up the cheese and add in.

One Pot Method:

Bring 1 cup water and the chicken with broth to a boil. Take off the heat, stir in the potato mixture, stirring well. Cover tightly and let sit for 5 minutes. In cooler weather use a pot cozy to retain heat.

Dice up the cheese and add in.

Serves 1.

Colcannon Mashers

Ingredients:
¾ cup instant mashed potatoes
2 Tbsp butter powder
2 Tbsp dry milk
2 Tbsp shelf stable bacon or bacon bits
2 Tbsp dried shredded cabbage
1 Tbsp diced dried shallots or onion
1 tsp dried parsley
1 tsp ground black pepper

Instructions:
At home pack everything a quart freezer or sandwich bag. Mark bag “Add 1¼ cups water”.

FBC method:

Add 1¼ cups near boiling water to the bag. Stir well, getting into the corners. Seal tightly and put in a cozy for 15 minutes. Stir again before serving.

Insulated mug method:

Add 1¼ cups boiling water to the dry ingredients. Stir well, cover tightly and let sit for 15 minutes. Stir again before serving.

One pot method:

Bring 1¼ cups water to a boil. Turn off the stove and in the dry ingredients. Stir well, cover tightly and let sit for 15 minutes. Stir again before serving. In cold temperatures you may want to put your pot in a pot cozy.

Add salt to taste, if desired.

Serves 1.

Notes:
The bacon can be left out for a vegetarian version, or for a more “meatier” version use a 3 or 5-ounce can of chicken, added with the water.

~Sarah