Hand Milled Soap

Cold process soap is a fascinating hobby (or business) to get into. Long ago, when my oldest was a baby I taught myself how to make soap. In the pre-internet days (for me), it was so much harder to learn. There wasn’t videos, and books were sparse at best. As I taught myself how to do it, I found a side niche I enjoyed, which was making hand milled soap from the cold process soap.

And what is hand milled soap? It is taking cold processed soap an extra step. You are left with custom bars of soap that are often much harder than first batch is. It saves on essential oils, but also allows one to make multiple types of soap from one base.

First, you must have soap base. Either make your favorite cold process soap, and let it cure fully – or find a soap maker who can sell you bars.

The not as fun part is grating the soap. It takes time. Use an old school metal box grater, or if you have it, a food processor with a cheese grating option. Or beg older children to do it…..

I use 2 pounds grated soap (weighed after grating). You will need a large stainless steel double boiler (though you can do this in a large heat safe glass mixing bowl in a pinch, however an actual double boiler is easier to use). Put a few inches water in the lower pot, bring to a simmer over medium heat. Put the double boiler over the water, add in the soap and ½ cup filtered water. Lower the heat to low and let slowly melt, stirring very gently with a silicone spatula, as needed. If the soap looks dry, add another ¼ cup water and mix in. The longer a soap has cured, the more water you may need. This isn’t a bad thing though. You learn after a few batches how to “read” how much water is needed.

You can use goats milk, but realize your soap will need to be used up much faster. Water gives a nearly indefinite shelf life.

As the soap softens and melts down, gently stir. It will go from looking like grated cheese to where it is a spreadable thick mixture, and pockets may appear slightly clear. Once all the soap appears melted, stir in any add-ins and essential oils. I use 100 to 120 drops of oil, you may prefer more. The smell won’t be strong at first, however as the soap cools and hardens over time, the heady smell of the soap goes away, and the essential oil smell becomes dominant (especially if you store your soap in plastic totes later). Add more if you are unsure, even up to 200 drops. I keep the add-ins at ¼ cup or so.

Scoop melted soap into a silicone rectangle mold (they are bread pan shaped), placed on a small cookie tray. Spread each scoop across the mold and gently rap to pack it in tight. Once all the soap is in the mold, smooth out the top, and rap firmly on the counter.

Let cool and set up overnight.

To unmold, place a piece of parchment paper on a cooling rack and turn the mold over gently. Pull the sides gently and press the bottom to release the soap. Remove the mold, and let the soap sit for another day, turning over halfway through, so all sides get a chance to dry.

Honey Oatmeal Orange Soap & Peppermint Soap.

Using a soap cutter, slide it through the soap to the size you prefer. I trim the ends as well, giving a uniform look to the bars. I cut between 5 and 6 bars, depending on which rectangle mold I use (one of mine is a little narrower and longer)

Separate each bar, and let sit for up to a week to dry.

Once the sides feel dry, line a storage tote with parchment paper and place the soap inside, and cover. Keep in a cool, dry and preferably out of direct sunlight. Once fully cured you may wish to box or bag the soaps individually.

This soap is Peppermint (peppermint leaves, dried and crushed, and peppermint essential oil).

~Sarah

Warming Oil For Winter

If you are like me, you probably have parts of your body that are never quite warm in winter, and often dry, from fabric rubbing against the skin constantly (sweater weather has some disadvantages).

Fractionated coconut oil absorbs into the skin quickly and leaves your skin feeling great. Add in warming essential oils and you will find your skin not only feels better, but you smell fabulous! In a rollerball, you have a gender fluid cologne roller. It’s warm. Spicy. Mysterious woodland feeling.

Warming Oil

Ingredients:

Directions:

If using a mason jar, add coconut oil, then essential oils. Seal tightly and shake. To use, shake gently, then open and dip a spoon in, take out a bit and apply to spots on the skin that are cold to the touch.

If using a rollerball, add oils to the rollerball, then top with coconut oil (you won’t use it all). Apply top, shake gently. Keep tightly sealed. Apply to cold parts of the body, by rolling on.

Disclaimer:

No claims are made as to any medicinal value of this oil. The information presented here is for educational purposes of traditional uses and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any diseases. Information on this site is not intended to be a substitute for medical or professional advice. Keep essential oils out of reach of children. Should you have a pre-existing medical condition, please consult your trusted health-care practitioner before using these products. Pregnant women should exercise caution when using essential oils. By using this site, you agree to indemnify administrators and owners for any and all responsibility regarding your wellbeing. Keep away from eyes, sinuses and other delicate skin areas. Do NOT use on young children under 5 years old.

Natural Body Care

My latest book is now published: Natural Body Care: Recipes That Soothe The Skin

It always feels real once the book is in your hands. This was a wonderful book to write and pull together. It sounds sappy, but this from my heart. It is what I loved doing and being able to share it with others?

Free yourself from body care that leaves your skin in worse shape than before:

35+ trusted recipes for allergen friendly handcrafted products. Top 8 allergen free.

Create your own products using pure oils, beeswax, salts and essential oils in your kitchen.

Lip scrub, lip balm, hand salve, body scrubs, foot soaks, rollerballs, sprays and more.

Free your body from an overload of chemicals and embrace a greener way of living and thrive in knowing what you are using.

These are the recipes for the products we sell, for everyone to enjoy them at home.

 

Spiced Hair Oil

If you are a brunette naturally, this hair oil recipe will saturate dried out winter hair. Rosemary is a natural booster for dark hair.

Spiced Hair Oil

Ingredients:

  • 3 Tbsp olive or fractionated coconut oil
  • 1 tsp dried rosemary
  • 1 tsp ground nutmeg

Directions:

Add ingredients to a small glass bottle, seal tightly and shake to distribute.

Stash in a cool and dry place, let infuse for a week.

If preferred, strain mixture through a fine mesh strainer, before using.

To use:

Wet hair, squeeze out. Apply oil to scalp and work out through hair. Let soak for 10 to 15 minutes, then rinse with warm water.

Shampoo after, rinsing well.

Do not use if you have a septic system as oil is not good for it.

Peppermint and Tangerine Foot Soak

Winter is for self-care and soothing the body. Taking time for yourself. And sharing handcrafted gifts with loved ones, so they can have a spa day, is a gift with love. Each batch whips up quickly. Tuck a pretty wooden measuring spoon with it, for easy sprinkling in the soak basin.

If you are local to Maple Valley, Washington and don’t want to make it yourself, we are offering 1 cup jars (8 ounce jars) that hold 4 bath’s worth, for $5. Local pickup. Contact for more info.

Peppermint and Tangerine Foot Soak

Directions:

In a glass bowl, stir together the salts. Add in essential oils, stir gently until mixed.

Transfer to a 8 ounce mason jar, sealing tightly.

To use:

Add 3 Tablespoons to your foot bath, at least ankle-deep, soak for at least 10 minutes.

Each batch makes 4 baths worth.

Disclaimer:

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. They are not medical advice. Our products and body care recipes contains essential oils. If any of the products cause skin irritation, discontinue use immediately. No claims are made as to any medicinal value of essential oils. The information presented here is for educational purposes of traditional uses and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any diseases. Information on this site is not intended to be a substitute for medical or professional advice. Keep essential oils out of reach of children. Should you have a pre-existing medical condition, please consult your trusted health-care practitioner before using these products. Pregnant women should exercise caution when using essential oils. By using this site, you agree to indemnify administrators and owners for any and all responsibility regarding your wellbeing.